Research

ACADEMIC OUTPUT AND ENGAGEMENT:

Forthcoming:

Pallitt, N. and Walton, M. (forthcoming 2015). “The Scripted Sandbox: Children’s Gameplay And Ludic Gendering” In Critical Perspectives on Technology and Education. Edited by Scott Bulfin, Nicola F. Johnson and Chris Bigum. Palgrave Macmillan. Details here.

2014:

Brown, C. and Pallitt, N. (2014). Laptops and Learning Spaces: Online, Offline and In Between. Presented at the 9th International Conference on Connected Learning. Edinburgh, Scotland. April 2014. Abstract and paper available here.

Pallitt, N. (2014). Games children play. Presented at the ‘Peace in our times’ Conference. South African Association for Women Graduates (SAAWG), Cape Town, 24 May. Details here.

“The inmates are running the asylum: Why social media is driving us crazy and how to stay sane” CHED Seminar co-presented with Laura Czerniewicz at UCT, 1 August. Details here.

Pallitt, N. (2014). ePortfolios for Educators. Workshop presented at the EdTech Summit South Africa. Cape Town, 11 August. Details: here and here.

Pallitt, N and Houslay, S. (2014). ePortfolio integration in an e-Marketing course. Presented at the UCT Teaching and Learning Conference. UCT October 2014. Presentation available here.

Pallitt, N. (2014). ‘Clique to play’: Mapping children’s gaming relationships in face-to-face settings. Presented at the Social Network Analysis workshop held on 19 November, UCT. Details here and here.

Pallitt, N. (2014). A checklist for successful ePortfolios. Open UCT. OER available here.

PRE-2014:

1. PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES:

2012:

Walton, M. and Pallitt, N. (2012). ‘Grand Theft South Africa’: Approaching game literacy for primary school children. International journal of Language and Education, Special Edition.

2. PEER REVIEWED CONFERENCE PAPERS:

2013:

Brown, C. & Pallitt, N. (forthcoming). Laptops and Learning Spaces: Online, Offline and In Between. 9th International Conference on Networked Learning, Edinburgh, Scotland.

2009:

“Scarce resources: Conflict and sharing in discourse around primary school email use” was published in the International Journal of Education and Development using ICT Vol. 5, No. 5. Available here.

3. CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS:

Pallitt, N. “’What’s happening?’: Students’ use of Twitter in a social media seminar” Emerge 2012 Online Conference, Conference Proceedings. Available here.

4. CONFERENCE AND COLLOQUIUM  –  PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS:

2013:

Brown, C. & Pallitt, N. “Laptops and learning spaces: online, offline and in between”. UCT Teaching and Learning Conference.

Abrahams, S.; Reddy, L. & Pallitt, N. “Live-tweeting in lectures to engage students in social and public health issues”. UCT Teaching and Learning Conference.

Pallitt, N. “Children as ‘produsers’: YouTube for Schools and learner-generated videos”. Google in Education Summit, Parklands, 26-27 September 2013.  Abstract here. Resources here.

Deacon, A;, Small, J. & Pallitt, N. 2013. Global citizenship badges: using gamification to recognize non-formal learning in a university context. Annual Conference on WWW Applications. Details here.

2012:

Pallitt, N. (2012). “Gender identities at play: Exploring children’s digital gaming in two settings in Cape Town” I presented findings from my PhD thesis at the Media Education, Digital Literacies and Young People colloquium at UCT with Prof. David Buckingham. Details here.

Pallitt, N. (2012). “’What’s happening?’: Students’ use of Twitter in a social media seminar” Elearning Update Conference, Johannesburg 1-3 August 2012. Presentation available here.

Pallitt, N. & Chetty, R. “Student video production across faculties: Filmmaking as teaching and learning strategy”. UCT Annual Conference on Teaching and Learning, 25 October 2012

2010 – 2011:

Pallitt, Nicola. (2011). ‘Grand Theft South Africa’: Approaching game literacy for primary school children in South Africa. Paper presented at the International Literacy conference Mobility, Language and Literacy, January 19-21, in Cape Town, South Africa.

Pallitt, Nicola. (2011). Multimod(el) me: Children’s character customization in The Sims 2 and Little Big Planet. Paper presented at the South African Multimodality in Education (SAME) Writers’ Workshop, May 23-25, in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

Pallitt, Nicola. (2011). Screen Play: Children configuring gender through character customization in The Sims 2 and Little Big Planet. Paper presented at the South African Association of Communications (SACOMM) conference, August 30-September 1, in Pretoria, South Africa.

Pallitt, Nicola; Walton, Marion and Koloko, Muya. (2011). Sex, violence and harm in games: An analysis of the guidelines for classification of the Film and Publication Board of South Africa. Paper presented at the South African Association of Communications (SACOMM) conference, August 30-September 1, in Pretoria, South Africa.

Pallitt, Nicola. (2011). Students’ use of Twitter in a social media seminar. UCT Annual Conference on Teaching and Learning.

2008:

“Children’s email use in a Western Cape primary school” data and discussion presented at the Children and Digital Media Colloquium

“Google in the classroom” co-presented with Marion Walton at Innovate 2008 Schools ICT conference

2007:

“Teaching poetry in high school: A discourse analysis of multimodality in learning materials” presented at The Fourteenth International Conference on Learning. Details here.

5. THESES:

2013:

Pallitt, N. (2013) “Gender identities at play: Exploring children’s digital gaming in two settings in Cape Town”. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Cape Town. Available here.

My PhD thesis investigates middle-class children’s digital gaming in two after-school settings in Cape Town. I focus on how children perform and interpret masculinities and femininities when gaming with peers. I am one of the first researcher to study games and culture in South Africa.

2008:

Pallitt, N. (2008) “Children’s discourse and software use in a Western Cape Primary School”. Unpublished Masters thesis, University of Cape Town. Available here.

My Masters thesis focused on the use of educational software at a disadvantaged primary school, where access to such resources were both scarce and new.

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